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Mitsubishi L200

Mitsubishi L200

Rating

3 stars

Quick Summary

Average. Another interesting alternative to the conventional off-roader - but not really suitable for more modest types.

Full Road Test

The market for lifestyle pick-up trucks has been booming in the UK recently and Mitsubishi is hoping that the new L200 will continue the sales success of its predecessor, which dominated the segment for the last few years. Not only does the new truck offer SUV-rivalling levels of practicality, but it also costs far less in tax for business users.

It's certainly got plenty of road presence thanks to XXL dimensions and distinctive styling. The curvaceous cab design looks for from utilitarian - while the range topping "Animal" and "Warrior" versions come with chunky bodykits and plenty of chrome jewellery.

Buyers swapping from a conventional car or off-roader are most likely to opt for the double-cab version, which gives reasonable space for four adults. The Mitsubishi's interior is finished to a higher standard than most of its pick-up rivals, featuring a well-designed dashboard and classy-looking instruments. Options include luxuries like leather upholstery and climate control. Another neat touch is the optional electrically descending rear screen, similar to that offered on the Land Rover Freelander.

Even in full double cab configuration, the L200 still has an abundance of cargo space. Buyers can opt for either an open loadbed at the back or, if you don't want to risk becoming an impromptu skip when parked in urban areas, this can be supplemented by an optional roll-out loadspace cover.

On-road the L200 drives surprisingly well, cruising comfortably at speed and with suspension that's more than up to dealing with urban potholes and speedbumps. Grip levels are relatively modest, but optional stability control helps to keep everything pointing in the right direction. Four-wheel drive makes it talented in the dirt, too, thanks to low-range gears and a locking centre differential. The only real weakness is the 2.4 litre diesel engine, which lacks urge and is gets loud when asked to accelerate hard.

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